KS2 English SATs 2016

The new SATs for KS2 (which your child will sit aged 11) consist of the following:

English Reading Paper

This paper consists of a reading booklet, which will include three texts (most likely a poem, a story and an information text).  Children are also given a separate booklet consisting of questions on these texts.  They are expected to write their answers in these booklets.

Your child will be given one hour to do this test.  It contains a total of 50 marks.

English Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling Paper

For this paper your child will need to know about a variety of different kinds of words, such as: verbs, adverbs, pronouns, prepositions, conjunctions, synonyms and antonyms.  They will also need to know about phrases and clauses.  They will need to have some knowledge of how to add prefixes and suffixes to words.  The types of punctuation they will need to know about include the following: question marks, apostrophes, semi-colons, colons, dashes, commas and hyphens.

They will be given 45 minutes to do this test.  It contains a total of 50 marks.

English Spelling Test

This test consists of 20 sentences which will be read aloud by the teacher.  One word is missing from each sentence on the sheet and when the teacher reads this word aloud, your child will need to write it down, trying to get the spelling correct.

It is expected that children will take about 15 minutes to do this test, but it is not strictly timed.  There are a total of 20 marks in this test.

You can download sample papers on the government website by clicking on this link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-curriculum-assessments-2016-sample-materials

KS2 Maths SATs 2016

The new SATs for KS1 (which your child will sit aged 11) consist of the following:

Arithmetic Paper

This paper tests children on the four operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division).  Children will be asked questions similar to the following: 6007 + 485, 389 - 11, 100 x 100 and 6000 ÷ 5.  There will also be questions involving fractions, decimals and percentages.

Your child will be given 30 minutes to do this test.  There are a total of 40 marks in this test.

Reasoning Papers 1 and 2

These papers test children on their ability to read word problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication and division and work out how to answer them.  They will also be given questions on fractions, decimals, percentages, ratio, proportion, algebra, measurement, geometry and statistics.

Your child will be given 40 minutes to do each test.  Each test has a total of 35 marks.

You can download sample papers on the government website by clicking on this link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-curriculum-assessments-2016-sample-materials

KS1 English SATs 2016

The new SATs for KS1 (which your child will sit aged 7) consist of the following:

English Reading Paper 1

This paper consists of a reading text and comprehension questions.  On each page, children are given a section of text and then a few questions to answer on that piece of text.  The paper will include a story and an information text.

It is expected that children will take about 30 minutes to do this test, but it is not strictly timed.  There are a total of 20 marks in this test.

English Reading Paper 2

This paper is harder (and has a higher word count) than Paper 1.  It consists of a reading booklet, which includes a story and an information text.  Children are also given a separate booklet consisting of questions on these texts.  They are expected to write their answers in these booklets.

It is expected that children will take about 40 minutes to do this test, but it is not strictly timed.  There are a total of 20 marks in this test.

English Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling Paper

This test has been introduced for the first time this year.  For this test, children will be expected to know what adverbs, adjectives, verbs and nouns are.  They will be expected to use past and present tense.  They will also need to know the different between statements, questions, commands, questions and exclamations.  They will need to know how to turn singular words into plural words.  Punctuation they will need to know about, includes: full stops, exclamation marks, question marks, capital letters, apostrophes for contractions and commas in lists.

It is expected that children will take about 20 minutes to do this test, but it is not strictly timed.  There are a total of 20 marks in this test.

English Spelling Test

This test consists of 20 sentences which will be read aloud by the teacher.  One word is missing from each sentence on the sheet and when the teacher reads this word aloud, your child will need to write it down, trying to get the spelling correct.

It is expected that children will take about 15 minutes to do this test, but it is not strictly timed.  There are a total of 20 marks in this test.

You can download sample papers on the government website by clicking on this link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-curriculum-assessments-2016-sample-materials

KS1 Maths SATs 2016

The new SATs for KS1 (which your child will sit aged 7) consist of the following:

Arithmetic Paper

This paper tests children on the four operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division).  Children will be asked questions similar to the following: 6 + 7, 18 + 10, 28 - 6, 56 - 30, 5 x 5, 12 ÷ 2.  They may also be given questions involving adding three separate numbers, or number sentences with gaps, for example: 7 + ___ = 12.  They will also be asked questions on fractions such as: 1/2 of 40 and 3/4 of 12.

It is expected that children will take about 20 minutes to do this test, but it is not strictly timed.  There are a total of 25 marks in this test.

Reasoning Paper 

This paper tests children on their ability to read word problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication and division and work out how to answer them.  They will also be given questions on fractions, measurement, geometry and statistics.

It is expected that children will take about 35 minutes to do this test, but it is not strictly timed.  There are a total of 35 marks in this test.

You can download sample papers on the government website by clicking on this link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-curriculum-assessments-2016-sample-materials

Number bond frogs

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An activity to engage pond-loving children!  See if you can find a picture of a frog on the internet and then copy it 5 times and print it out.  Do the same with a picture of a lily pad.  (Alternatively you could find outlines of both if your child wants to colour them in?)  Write or stick the numbers 1 - 5 on the frogs and then 5 - 10 on the lily pads.  Your child now needs to make each of the five frogs hop onto the correct lily pad to equal ten each time!

Multiplication activity

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Lego can be a great way to teach your child multiplication and division.  One way to do this is to give them a number and ask them to represent this as a 'block' or rectangle.  For example: if you give them the number 30, they need to look at the circles on the top of the lego and then represent this number according to which two numbers you could multiply together to make it (the one shown in the picture is a 6 x 5 block).  You could also use this method for helping solve area problems (which often crop up in the 11 plus).  Children may be asked to work out the dimensions of a rectangle that has an area of 20cm squared.  The second rectangle here shows how those dimensions could be 4 x 5.  There are some good worksheets on area on this website: http://www.primaryresources.co.uk/maths/mathsE4.htm 

Compound words

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Help your child to learn the spelling of compound words with this engaging activity: take a piece of lined A4 paper and hold it portrait.  Fold both sides inwards so that the sides touch in the middle.  You will probably want to use two lines of the paper per word.  Write each half of the compound word on each flap, so that the whole word can be seen when the flaps are closed.  Inside, draw a picture to go with the word.  Look for lists of compound words on this website: http://www.enchantedlearning.com/grammar/compoundwords/

Number bonds to ten – hidden number

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Write numbers 1 to 10 on the bottom of ten lolly sticks.  Roll out some playdough and then stick the lolly sticks (hiding the numbers) into the playdough (or you could use sand).  Ask your child to take out any number.  What number do they have to add to this number to make ten?  This activity could also be used for general addition (take any two sticks and add them together in your head).  You could also make it harder for older children, for example: pick a lolly stick and tell me if the number is prime or square or neither.  Here are more ideas for learning number bonds to ten: https://www.pinterest.com/search/pins/?q=number+bonds+to+ten

Prime numbers

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A prime number is a number that can only be divided by one or itself.  It is important your child knows their prime numbers off-by-heart for their 11+ as the concept is very likely to arise.  This game will help them to have fun while doing this!  Cut up some card so that you have 25 small squares.  Write the numbers 1 to 25 on these.  Put all the cards face down on a table.  You will also need a basket or pot to 'throw away' numbers that are not prime.  Take it in turns to turn over a card - if the number you turn over is prime, you keep it, if it is not you 'throw it away' in the basket.  The game ends when all the cards have been turned over and the winner is the person with the most prime numbers.  For more ideas on prime numbers: https://www.pinterest.com/search/pins/?q=prime+numbers

SATs practice motivation

It is common for children to find reading comprehensions boring and laborious.  A good way to prepare for the reading part of your child's SATs test, is to give them short, daily reading comprehensions (lasting no more than 15 - 20 minutes).  It is also good to tackle a whole practise SATs reading paper from time to time.  Remember that for the 3-mark questions, they need to write a few sentences and give a detailed answer.  I find that children are really motivated if you 'score' their answer out of 3.  It helps them to see where they are going wrong and where they need to improve.